Courses Overview >> Short courses >> Becoming Indigenous - Short Residential Programme

Becoming Indigenous - Short Residential Programme

Course dates: 
Friday, 1 September, 2017 to Saturday, 21 October, 2017

With Colin Campbell, Pat McCabe, Lyla June Johnston, Eve Annecke, Lucy Hinton, Carolyn Hillyer and Nigel Shaw

1 September – 21 October residential
16 – 20 July 2018 residential

Due to demand, we are opening our Becoming Indigenous Programme as a short-term residential programme this year.

The Becoming Indigenous Short Residential Programme will begin with a home-making weekend at Schumacher College, followed by teaching, ritual, vigil, ceremony and conversation with teachers that have roots in three indigenous traditions (South Africa, North America and the British Isles), concluding with a ceremony in a roundhouse on the wild moor. The group will then return for one residential week in July 2018 to share stories and learning.

This programme asks deep questions about what it means to be at home, as humans on planet earth, connected to the land, to the wild, to community and to our ancestors, at this time in history when many of these connections have been broken.

This is a highly experiential programme in which we will be aiming to create our own indigenous practice. No previous experience is necessary, just an openness to learn from other traditions, cultures and stories, to explore and to experiment.

Running from 1 September – 20 October, this seven week programme will include the following courses:

1 - 3 September: Home-making weekend
4 - 15 September: Indigeny and Connecting to Place, with Eve Annecke and Colin Campbell
18 - 29 September: Bones of Ritual, with Colin Campbell and Lucy Hinton
2 - 6 October: Making Ceremony, with Pat McCabe and Colin Campbell
9 - 13 October: The Wounded Healer, with Pat McCabe and Lyla June Johnston
16 -20 October: Dartmoor Pilgrimage and Roundhouse Ceremony, with Carolyn Hillyer and Nigel Shaw
October – July – online group meetings
16 - 20 July 2018: Coming Home Week

Participants will share this experience with others on the full programme running until December and those coming for a limited number of week-long courses.

For background info see full programme details here: https://www.schumachercollege.org.uk/courses/short-courses/becoming-indigenous-2017-finding-our-way-home.

For those who cannot stay for our longer residential programmes, there is an option to take week-long short courses as part of the Becoming Indigenous programme.  You can find these at the bottom of the page.


Contributors

Colin Campbell grew up in rural southeastern Botswana, the son of a renowned anthropologist and a creative healing mother. He is currently a practitioner of traditional African medicine, based in Cape Town, South Africa and the UK. He receives clients from all over the world, and facilitates international group processes relating to natural law, transformation, healing & personal power, sacred sites, and cross-cultural cosmology.

His work bridges major world cities with ancestral homelands and forgotten wilderness, taking him from the Amazon Basin to Los Angeles, the sacred sites of Venda to the urban grit of Johannesburg, and remote Ethiopia to the City of London. Colin co-founded and co-runs a training school in Botswana for traditional doctors and sangomas with his brother Niall Campbell. He is also a lifelong artist and musician, his style once again bridging the traditional with the contemporary, the timeless with the timely, and the sounds of the sacred with the lyricism of electric rocking funk.The programme will have two taught components separated by an online period of self-directed individual inquiry, online webinars and mentoring.

Woman Stands Shining, Pat McCabe, has the honour of being of the Dine (Navajo) Nation. She brings the understanding of Indigenous ways of knowing into discussion and inquiry on Sustainability. She carries the foundation of Beauty and Spirit into places where it has formerly been kept out. Pat is an active participant in Indigenous Peoples gatherings worldwide most recently in Chile, Belgium, Ecuador, Peru, Mexico and Bali. She has worked with the International Center for Cultural Studies in India and with Sarvodaya with Dr. A.T. Ariyaratne in Sri Lanka, as well as with organizations and gatherings in the U.S. Her recent work includes being a cultural consultant to the Pachamama Alliance, presenting at the 2013 National Bioneers Conference, and presenting on “The Feminine Design and Sustainability” in the U.S. and Internationally.

Lyla June Johnston was raised in Taos, New Mexico and is a descendent of Diné (Navajo) and Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) lineages. Her personal mission in life is to grow closer to Creator by learning how to love deeper. This prayer has taken her on many journeys and materializes in diverse ways.She is a student of global cycles of violence that eventually gave rise to The Native American Holocaust and the destruction of many cyclic relationships between human beings and nature. This exploration birthed her passion for revitalizing spiritual relationships with Mother Earth and cultivating spaces for forgiveness and reconciliation to occur between cultural groups. She is a co-founder of The Taos Peace and Reconciliation Council, which works to heal intergenerational trauma and ethnic division in the northern New Mexico. She is a walker within the Nihigaal Bee Iiná Movement, a 1,000-mile prayer walk through Diné Tah (the Navajo homeland) that is exposing the exploitation of Diné land and people by uranium, coal, oil and gas industries. She is the lead organizer of the Black Hill Unity Concert which gathers native and nonnative musicians to pray for the return of guardianship of the Black Hills to the Lakota, Nakota and Dakota nations. She is the also the founder of Regeneration Festival, an annual celebration of children that occurs in 13 countries around the world every September.

Mac Macartney is an international speaker, writer and change-maker. He is also the founder of Embercombe, the centre for leadership and learning with a mission to catalyse the emergence of leaders and change-makers for a just, peaceful and sustainable future. Over a period of twenty years Mac was mentored by a group of indigenous elders. During this training and ever since, he has attempted to bring two worlds together – an ancient world-view that emphasises relationship, interdependence, and reverence for life with the significant challenges and opportunities of the 21st Century. Mac works with leaders across all walks of life – from business to education – inspiring them to put up their hand and join the chorus of people who are singing alive the world of our longing. He was a faculty member of the WWF/IMD Business School ‘One Planet Leaders’ programme in Lausanne for three years and received an Honorary Doctorate in Education from Plymouth University for his work in service to community.

In 2016 Mac co-founded Liquid School, a network of experts helping organisations imagine a sustainable future. He sits on the Advisory Board for DanoneWave, the largest Public Benefit Corporation in the U.S. and is an Associate with Leaders’ Quest, collaborating on global issues with leaders across business, government and civil society.

Mac Macartney is an international speaker, writer and change-maker. He is also the founder of Embercombe, the centre for leadership and learning with a mission to catalyse the emergence of leaders and change-makers for a just, peaceful and sustainable future. Over a period of twenty years Mac was mentored by a group of indigenous elders. During this training and ever since, he has attempted to bring two worlds together – an ancient world-view that emphasises relationship, interdependence, and reverence for life with the significant challenges and opportunities of the 21st Century. Mac works with leaders across all walks of life – from business to education – inspiring them to put up their hand and join the chorus of people who are singing alive the world of our longing. He was a faculty member of the WWF/IMD Business School ‘One Planet Leaders’ programme in Lausanne for three years and received an Honorary Doctorate in Education from Plymouth University for his work in service to community. In 2016 Mac co-founded Liquid School, a network of experts helping organisations imagine a sustainable future. He sits on the Advisory Board for DanoneWave, the largest Public Benefit Corporation in the U.S. and is an Associate with Leaders’ Quest, collaborating on global issues with leaders across business, government and civil society.

Eve Annecke, co-founder and director of the Sustainability Insitute in South Africa has been an occasional short course participant at Schumacher College. Seven other members of the Sustainability Institute team recently attended Ecoliteracy: First principals for radical change. Hundreds of miles away from the Sustainability Institute in both distance and context, she talks about the work at Schumacher College as being deeply influential. “In all the creative work we have done in the last 10 years the work we have done with Schumacher has been one of the highlights."

Lucy Hinton is a wilderness quest guide, earth educator, sustainability consultant, creative activist, lover of soul.  A natural communicator, Lucy is amongst other things a bridge-maker, and applies her skills in various contexts.  Lucy has a degree in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge, taught earth education from a young age, co-pioneered creative projects for social change and has traveled and worked widely, from Death Valley to Honduras, Sumatra to Outer Mongolia.  Over time she gravitated toward the place where the needs of the world converge with the needs of the Self. This trajectory led to training and apprenticeship in the field known as contemporary wilderness rites of passage, largely in the system taught by the School of Lost Borders, and Lucy has been co-guiding in this capacity for almost ten years, continuing to learn from fellow humans, books, rocks, creatures, stories & stars.  Significant & prolonged trials of illness & physical disability have also offered their own lessons in patience, initiatory terrain and appreciation of the simple things.  She has a deep love of both people and land.

Carolyn Hillyer is a renowned artist, musician, writer, drum maker and workshop teacher of thirty years standing, who lives and works on an ancient farmstead amid the wild hills of Dartmoor, southwest England. She sings of ancient spirit and hidden memory, and has released 14 music albums (solo projects and collaborations). She write about ancestral roots and the deep experience of women in the weaving of courageous life paths; her books include Sacred House: Where Women Weave Words into the Earth and, more recently, Weavers’ Oracle: Journey Cards and Travel Guide. She paints life-size images of archetypal and mythological women, which are regularly exhibited as large shrine installations. For many years she has been creating (and teaching the making of) traditional skin drums using the hides of deer, wild horse, reindeer and salmon. The ceremonial neolithic-style roundhouse built at their farm with her husband and musical partner (the composer Nigel Shaw), is the focal point for her work around the deep ancestry of the British Isles. Carolyn travels widely with her work, most recently to Arctic Siberia’s frozen edge, the northwest Pacific ocean rim and the Negev Desert’s burning heart. Dartmoor, however, continues through long decades to be her profound source of inspiration.

Nigel Shaw has produced a highly regarded and diverse collection of recordings over the last 30 years. His gentle and soul-filled instrumental works, and ability to infuse his music with a powerful yearning for wild nature, have come to define his unique approach to sacred sound. Classic albums such as The River and Requiem: Well of Souls continue to be significant and widely appreciated decades after their initial release. More recently he has composed a series of albums that honour the sweet and raw ancient moorland landscape: Dartmoor Journey, Dartmoor Roundhouse and Dartmoor Symphony, which received its orchestral world premiere in 2010. He has created and directed strong, musically dynamic projects with the albums Ancestors (inspired by the songs of the indigenous people of the Siberian Arctic) and Exile (which honours the human experience of being displaced from home and tribe). His work has encompassed wilder strands of dance music as co-founder of the festival bands Riven and Global. He also performs with Bamboo Cedar Oak, a brotherhood of master flute players that also includes Guillermo Martinez (USA) & Hiroki Okano (Japan).

 

 

Fee: 
£ 4 763.00
THE RESIDENTIAL FEE includes private accommodation, all food and snacks, teaching and facilitation, online support and mentoring and final homecoming week. NON-RESIDENTIAL FEE (Call Tel: +44 (0) 1803 847237 To Book) = £3470 does not include accommodation but does include lunch, dinner and snacks for all short course and Home Weeks, teaching and facilitation, online support and mentoring for the first term and the final homecoming week. The Becoming Indigenous Programme will be based in the elegant surrounds of Dartington Hall's Elmhirst Centre, the College's second venue.

 

Upcoming Becoming Indigenous Courses

Becoming Indigenous 2017 - Finding our way home - This 10 month programme is a deep journey into the question of what it means to be indigenous to our place, our land and our community. This programme includes the following individual courses available to book separately.