Courses Overview >> Postgraduate Programmes >> MA, Ecology and Spirituality >> MA, Ecology and Spirituality – Modules

MA, Ecology and Spirituality – Modules

MA, PG Dip, PG Cert
Full and part-time blended learning

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Ecology and Spirituality
Residential/CORE
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To critically examine the philosophy, evolution and consequences of scientific and spiritual thought about the natural world and the place of the human within it.
  • To analyse and assess current theories and narratives about the natural world and man, focussing specifically on those that bridge the gap between scientific and spiritual ways of knowing.
  • To directly experience and assess the validity of different ways of acquiring knowledge about the natural world, oneself and others.
The Ecological Self
Residential
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To examine the theory of the ‘ecological self’ from psychological, scientific and spiritual perspectives.
  • To experience and critically assess personal and group practices for developing the ‘ecological self’ and ‘reconnecting’ with the natural world, each other and oneself.
  • To develop a dynamic and purposeful personal narrative based on life experience, values, beliefs, and a sense of a developing ‘ecosophy’ (ecological philosophy).
Indigeny Today
Residential
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To investigate the cosmological narratives and practices of a number of indigenous traditions around the world, particularly in regard to relationship with the natural world, from both anthropological and experiential perspectives;
  • To evaluate how common elements of indigenous practice can inform personal practice and collective actions around place-making, spiritual practice and sustainable living;
  • To develop individual understanding and experience of place, home, indigeny, nature-connection and sustainable practice in modern times.
Sacred Activism
Residential
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To examine the dynamics of personal and collective action for change and its relationship with belief, values, meaning, purpose and narrative.
  • To evaluate different examples of collective cohesion and group action around the world in response to different scenarios.
  • To assess the role of spirituality and spiritual practice in the activist arena.
  • To develop an individual’s ‘plan of action’ in the world based on an understanding of personal purpose and narrative.
Western Esotericism
Residential
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To critically examine the history and development of Western Esotericism, from Late Antiquity to the present, and to assess its role in contemporary culture.
  • To critically examine the emergence of Neo-Paganism, from its roots in Romanticism and the ideas of late Victorian Anthropology to its flowering in the second half of the twentieth century.
  • To explore belief and praxis in some Western Esoteric traditions, with special regard to ritual, magic, ecology, seasonality and place.
Evolution and Spirituality
Residential
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To critically understand a range of orthodox and heterodox discourses of evolution in Western thought
  • To explore the often contested ways in which these different discourses situate humans in relationship to the cosmos.
  • To explore organicist and processual traditions within Western philosophy.
  • To understand the human-ecological implications of the various discourses of evolution.
Religion and the Environment
Distance Learning
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To examine critically the ecological legacy of a variety of religious traditions.
  • To assess the extent to which ‘religion’ can be a useful resource for the formulation of a positive 21st century environmental ethic.
Environmental Philosophy
Distance Learning
20 credits
 
AIM(S)

This module will explore some key perspectives in the broad area of environmental philosophy, beginning with one of modern environmentalism’s key writers: Aldo Leopold, and in particular his notion of a ‘land ethic’. The module will cover some or all of the following:

  • normative stances in environmental ethics;
  • development ethics, population ethics, and ethical approaches to climate change;
  • the concept of sustainable development;
  • obligations to future generations;
  • global citizenship and international co-operation;
  • allegiances and divergences between animal ethics and environmental ethics.
Heavenly Discourses
Distance Learning
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To introduce students to the history of the role of the sky in western thought.
  • To become familiar with the use of visual data as a means of establishing evidence for the existence of celestial symbolism in culture.
  • To examine the evidence in recent academic literature for celestial knowledge within a variety of cultures.
  • To become familiar with the cultural context of modern developments in modern
Sacred Geography
Distance Learning
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • • To reach a sophisticated understanding of the concept of 'sacred geography'.
  • To critically examine the theories of sacred and profane space
  • To consider whether the sacred is inherent in space, or is projected on to it.
  • To critically explore the theory and practice of pilgrimage.
Cosmology, Magic and Divination
Distance Learning
20 credits
 
AIM(S)
  • To introduce students to the theory and practice of magic, divination and oracles.
  • To locate such practices within classical and Hellenistic cosmology and the development of astrology.
  • To explore the wider context of ancient Near Eastern divination and magic.
  • • To consider the legacy of Hellenistic and Classical divinatory, magical and oracular practices in post-Classical culture.

Full details of the course and how to apply can be found on the course details page here ›